Barriers to abortion access for Irish people with disabilities

Hey Everyone! Going to explain the format of a Twitter chat! The most important thing is to use #PWD4Repeal or your tweets will be lost in the void.

There are five questions we are going to explore tonight: You can find them here:

Tweet your answer in the format A1 [insert your answer here] #PWD4Repeal

Q1 – Let’s talk airports – as they are a crucial part of Irish peoples abortion access. What are airports like for you? What barriers exist there? #PWD4Repeal

Q2 – Public transport – What about in Ireland – What barriers exist in getting to the airport? #PWD4Repeal

Q3 – And when we are abroad – what barriers exist in travelling IN another country?  #PWD4Repeal

Q4 – What about organizing it? From phone calls to medical history to clinics? What barriers exist there? #PWD4Repeal

Q5 – What clinic barriers exist? #PWD4Repeal

Q6 – Other barriers we have forgotten/didn’t address? ##PWD4Repeal

 Ensure  “The rights of persons with disabilities to decide freely and responsibly on the number and spacing of their children” — Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

 

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Statement of PWDR on CRPD omission

Press Release

For General Release 09/03/18

People with Disabilities for Repeal condemn government for failure and deceit in Convention On The Rights Of Persons With Disabilities  ratification.

After an 11-year delay, on Wednesday Ireland became the last country in the EU to ratify the Convention On The Rights Of Persons With Disabilities.

The delay experienced was unacceptable, but the schedule put forward allowed for ratification of both the Treaty and the optional Protocol at the same time. This would allow for enforcement from the get go. As Ireland stated that it would not ratify until it was in compliance, this seemed fair.

The Disability Rights Community, had been relying on this promise – so when during the Dail debate, Minister McGrath skirted questions on the optional protocol, backs were raised.

It has since been confirmed that along with three major reservations (exceptions to basic rights), the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities  is being passed without the OP. This is contrary to repeated assurances given to the disability rights community that they would be ratified together. The wider disability community were not consulted or informed when the government went back on their pledge to ratify the CRPD and the OP together.  It is unclear if any disabled peoples’ organisation was consulted or informed.

This is an incredibly disappointing decision that undermines Ireland’s claimed commitment to the effective realisation of disability rights.

The Convention On The Rights Of Persons With Disabilities  OP allows for communications from individuals/groups to the Convention On The Rights Of Persons With Disabilities  committee. It is the most effective measure we would have to hold the government to account, to seek action on the violations of rights faced by Irish people with disabilities.

We’ve been given our rights but no means to enforce them.   The Op was the main way that people with disabilities could hold the government to account internationally.

That write the reports, and disabled peoples organisations only contribute through shadow reporting. This is not sufficient

Reporting happens on the governments terms. Reports are written  by government agencies. Civil society can only contribute  through shadow reporting.

Also reports have to look at every single rights violation, in all areas of life. This means we can only see the tip of the iceberg of rights violations.

Without the OPTIONAL PROTOCOL   huge rights violations (like the current housing situation and those who suffer  under it) will only be examined as part of the larger picture. There will not be enough time or resources to address them.

Several TD’s asked about the ratification of the optional protocol. The question was skirted by Minister McGrath, who instead used his response time to justify why there was no Irish Sign Language interpreter or closed  captioning on a disability debate.

Minister McGrath and his governments actions on this is a betrayal of the people with disabilities residing in this country.  Not only are we gaining what is effectively a toothless treaty, we have been victims of a fraud in the concealment of the omission of the optional protocol.

Information

People with Disabilities for Repeal, are a group of people with disabilities, and disability rights activists who are campaigning for self-determination in Irish law. Reproductive rights are disability rights and we want to make them a reality for all Irish people.

Our spokes people are Maria Ni Fhlatharta 0857057691 and Alannah Murray 0852291106 and can be emailed at  repealanddisability@gmail.com

Ends

Why Abortion is a Disability Rights Issue

Hey Everyone! Going to explain the format of a Twitter chat! The most important thing is to use #DisabilityAndAbortion or your tweets will be lost in the void.

There are five questions we are going to explore tonight: You can find them here:

Tweet your answer in the format A1 [insert your answer here] #DisabilityAndAbortion

Q1 – Why is Abortion a disability rights issue? # DisabilityAndAbortion

Q2 – Why aren’t disabled women’s voices being centred in discussions around disability and abortion? #DisabilityAndAbortion

Q3 – Is there equal access to abortion for disabled women? What barriers exist in the UK export model of abortion care? #DisabilityAndAbortion

Q4 – Why is Autonomy Important to disability rights? #DisabilityAndAbortion

Q5 – How do we treat disabled women’s reproductive rights in general? #DisabilityAndAbortion

 Ensure  “The rights of persons with disabilities to decide freely and responsibly on the number and spacing of their children” — Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities